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Top Ten Tuesday 24 July 2012

So, quick news before I get down to business…

Friday night was my friend’s first fight (we’ll call her Belle…she kind of looks like Belle from Beauty and the Beast…this is Turtle’s fiancée)…and she kicked butt. Literally. I drove an hour to watch a killer minute and a half round and I’m super proud of her! Yay!

Saturday was the Wine Walk on Delaware. While it didn’t to much for my current diet, I made some good connections and had as much fun as I do any time I get to talk about wine for several hours straight. I had to ice down my voicebox the next day because they had me attempting to talk over a guy playing music in a very echo-y space, so that was rough, but I still had a lot of fun. Next time I’m going to bug my contact to put the musician upstairs or something where I don’t have to strain my voice. (Of course, I’m going to kick my contact’s butt if he puts another scented candle in my tasting area….)

Sunday was the birthday of one of the boyfriend’s cousins and also her last game before State Championships in softball. They won the game the boyfriend and I made it down to, so yay! They ended up losing the championship, but it was to a team that plays competitively for the whole season (her team plays recreational, then “all-stars” are chosen to play in tournaments to get to go to the state level). And! They only lost 2-0 to these girls that looked about 5 years older than the league (seriously, I wonder what’s in the water in that town!).

So, enough rambling, time for the weekly bit of awesome sauce from the folks at The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Most Vivid Worlds/Settings in Book

10. Kibou-diani from Cryoburn by Lois McMaster Bujold: More specifically, I LOVE the catacombs beneath the world. The darkness and panic is just simply perfect for the opening of this wonderful book in the Vorkosigan Saga.

9. Barsoom from A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs: I know it’s not scientifically correct, but I LOVE Barsoom (and I can’t wait to visit its real-world location for the John Carter film next month).

8. Goodsmanwood from The Darkest Part of the Woods by Ramsey Campbell: The woods are very dark and deep, so to say…and the book uses its setting to beautiful degree as its main character. [More on my review over at SciFi4Me.com]

7. Westeros from the A Song of Ice and Fire series by George R.R. Martin: Duh! Can’t you just fill the winter’s chill creeping up on you from the very beginning of A Game of Thrones? The wolves feel real, as does the snow, and the heights of the Eyrie dizzied me from the first passage.

6. Panem from The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins: Taking a note from the wonderful Julia from The Broke and Bookish, I have to agree with her choice of Panem. It’s dreary and dreadful in District 12, but it feels so dreary it can’t help but be real. I almost feel like I’ve stepped back to the old coal mines of the 18th century in this wonderful bit of YA fiction.

5. Fortriu from The Dark Mirror by Juliet Marillier: While it is technically based off of a historical place, Juliet Marillier fills in the details of the 6th century Pictish homeland as if she had grown up there herself. Everything from the flora and fauna down to the reasons for various deity worship ring perfect in this first novel of a trilogy.

4. Sevenwaters from Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier: She does it again! Sevenwaters feels so real, I feel like I need to go there on vacation. It’s the perfect escape!

3. Midkemia and Kelewar from the Riftwar Saga by Raymond Feist: Oh my god, can these exist, please? While Midkemia provides the perfect typical fantasy setting, Kelewar provides a beautiful (and colorful) tropical alternative not often seen in the genre.

2. The world of Harry Potter from the Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling: Again, a duh. How many of us have waited on our letters from Hogwarts? After all, Quidditch is a sport nowadays.

1. Middle Earth from The Lord of the Rings books by J.R.R. Tolkien: And, lastly, a duh. I would live in Mirkwood in a heartbeat (of course, then again…spiders).

Top Ten Tuesday 17 July 12

Yeah, I know, I’m running behind today. But, HEY! I forgot it was Tuesday. And I had an eventful weekend. And stuffs. Excuses. Things.

Top Ten Books For People Who Like X Book

10. If you like The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, you should read “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” by none other than Edgar Allan Poe. It’s the first of its kind in mystery, and it’s a quick read!

9. If you like Ella Enchanted, you should read The Grimms’ Fairy Tales. The original collected tales are, well, enchanting!

8. If you like The Lovely Bones, you should read Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson. The bad guy isn’t as apparent, but it’s really quite wonderful in a similar sense as Bones. Oh, but the movie adaptation is probably one of the worst. Avoid it at all costs.

7. It’s a gimme but if you like Game of Thrones, you should read both The Lord of the Rings and The Riftwar Saga.

6. If you like The Diary of Anne Frank, you should read Confessions of a Pagan Nun by Kate Horsley. The novel is set in a diary-like form alternating between current events and flashbacks and features a strong center of religious persecution.

5. If you like Daughter of the Forest, you should read Juliet Marillier’s other novels…specifically The Dark Mirror.

4. If you like Dracula, you should read Interview with a Vampire or any of the other vampire novels by Anne Rice.

3. If you like Interview with a Vampire or any of the other novels by Anne Rice, you should read The Silver Wolf by Alice Borchardt (Anne Rice’s sister).

2. If you like 1984, you should read Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. Hello dystopia!

1. If you like anything horrific and suspenseful (such as works by H.P. Lovecraft), you should read The Darkest Part of the Woods by Ramsey Campbell. I’ve got a review in the works over at SciFi4Me, so stay tuned!

Yup, I feel like I’ve phone this bad boy in, but voila! What do ya think?